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Film Structure & Craft

This category contains 9 posts

Stop Splitting Theatrical Movies into Multiple Parts

A few years ago, I wrote a double-review of sorts for Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner (1984) and Denis Villeneuve’s Blade Runner 2049 (2017); I remarked the latter filmmaker, recently ascended to the big-budget, high-concept genre blockbusters of Hollywood, should be given the keys to any franchise he wanted given his filmography’s remarkable consistency and innate … Continue reading

Why do I like Ultraviolent Action Scenes & Super Fancy Musical Numbers?

A prominent feature of my cinephilia is my affection for two seemingly unrelated film genres: The action movie and the film musical. The key word in the previous sentence is “seemingly,” because while action and musical films may attract different audiences and imply disparate narrative tones, the core of their appeal and their overarching visual … Continue reading

How Long Should a Cinematic Narrative Be?

When reviewing movies, television shows, mini-series, etc., I am conscientious of the fact I repeat several criticisms across many projects. Feature-length films in particular (~1.5-2.5 hours, on average), I feel, struggle with the “right” amount of storytelling to fit into a “proper” running time; while exceptions of long, purposefully meandering films like Gone with the … Continue reading

More Filmmaking Pet-Peeves…

Several years ago, I wrote about recurring problems in mainstream filmmaking that are a constant source of irritation for cinephiles like me. This burgeoning “series” of blog essays is thematically related to my Things You Like That I Don’t (TYLTID) posts, in a way, an expansive yet not exhaustive list of cinematic annoyances that reduce … Continue reading

Rules Aren’t Always Made to be Broken: Five Filmmaking Pet-Peeves

As even laymen know, filmmaking is hardly an exact science, and exceptions to common rules and contextual details of film production are as important to film history and popular film culture as the most reliable screenwriting-101 rule. A film does not always require a protagonist, a character need not always possess an arc, an eye-line … Continue reading

The Movie-Medium Debate: Film vs Digital

If you’re anything of a movie-buff, you’re aware that the past decade of filmmaking, and in particular the past ten twenty-some years of film distribution, have been wrapped in a controversy so intriguing that it calls into question the very medium of movies themselves: The introduction and subsequent domination of HD digital video cameras to … Continue reading

Diamonds in the Rough: Four Underrated Filmmakers

This is a companion piece to my other director-centric article, my picks for the Top Five Overrated Filmmakers, in which I discussed movie-directors who get way more critical support and fan-credit than they deserve. Today I’ll tackle the opposite end of the spectrum: Directors who have proved their worth, have made good (in some cases, … Continue reading

A Little Cocky, Here: Top Five Overrated Filmmakers

A proud pastime of movie-lovers the world over is debating whose favorite filmmakers are better than others. It’s remarkably similar to how sports fans boast over their favorite sports franchises or players, or how music-buffs argue whose beloved¬†artist is more “mainstream” or “selling out” or is more influential. Debates over favorite filmmakers, namely directors, are … Continue reading

The Kids Are Alright: The 10 Most Effective Remakes, Reboots, and Re-Imaginings in Hollywood

Every cinephile has opinions on film remakes, franchise reboots, or brand-name title “re-imaginings,” or however/whatever you define them. Remakes have become so prevalent in today’s saturated pop culture markets because film industries like Hollywood recognize the marketability, brand recognition, and overall financial security that an already established title has with the masses. Remakes of classic … Continue reading