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Film Content & Controversies

This category contains 12 posts

The Possible Future(s) of Movie Theatres

I’ve discussed my distaste for viewing movies in public before, and with some exceptions (e.g. college campus, independent arthouse, and film festival theatres), I argue the theatrical experience is not worth the money, time, and energy necessary to patronize it. Most patrons themselves are obnoxious, loud, and disruptive, distracting from the “immersive cinematic experience” of … Continue reading

Possible Franchise Expansions on Streaming Platforms

In light of the successful revivals of intellectual properties (IPs) like Star Wars (theatrical releases [1977–2019]; expanded as The Mandalorian [2019-] and other shows on Disney+), The Karate Kid (theatrical releases [1984, 1986, 1989]; expanded with Cobra Kai [2019-] on YouTube Premium and later on Netflix), and Lost in Space (original broadcast television series [1965-1968]; … Continue reading

How to Hate (or Love) Movies without Really Trying: Types of Film-Viewing Biases

As both a celebration of my 500th(!) post on this website and as a reaction to numerous criticisms of the widespread “movie-review format,” today I shall analyze what I perceive are the major types of biases that corrupt viewers’ interpretation and enjoyment of films. I published my 500th essay last month, yet never found the … Continue reading

The Not-So-Magical Theatrical Experience

Sooner or later, cinephiles debate with themselves or general moviegoers the merits of seeing films on the big-screen, also known as “the theatrical experience.” These discussions may be more or less frequent depending on the quality of local theatre chains (e.g. Alamo Drafthouse), the quantity of peers’ streaming subscriptions, people’s general tastes in genre or … Continue reading

The Devil on Your Shoulder, Last Part: Like My Father Before Me

My contemplation on the nature of Jungian shadows, shoulder angels, and facing the temptations of our worst instincts ends with the original Hollywood blockbuster incarnation of negativity: The Return of the Jedi’s (1983) Emperor Palpatine. Arguably the most popular and parodied symbol of evil, authoritarianism, and general villainy in modern pop culture, Ian McDiarmid’s cruel, … Continue reading

The Devil on Your Shoulder, Part II: Let Fear Find You Again

Another series of films that deal with obvious, yet not on-the-nose representations of Jungian shadows or shoulder angels are Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight (2005, 2008, 2012) franchise. In the broadest terms, the trilogy could be interpreted as a thematic analysis of fear, how it can evolve from an enemy to an ally. Batman BeginsĀ introduces this … Continue reading

The Devil on Your Shoulder, Part I: You’re Not a Mistake

“These boys come in here, this is how they survive. They gotta fight for life — kill or be killed. People die in there! Your Daddy died in the ring…” American writer William Faulkner is credited as saying, “The only thing worth writing about is the human heart in conflict with itself.” I first stumbled … Continue reading

Using Movies as Personal Soapboxes

As I noted in my commentary on genre-snobbery in film criticism, film style supersedes film content andĀ films must be judged on their terms if we consider ourselves to be true, objective lovers of cinema. Using a particular movie as a case-study for sociological analysis, for instance, in which complete disregard of the study of cinematic … Continue reading

Cinematic Snobbery: “Genre Film” is Film, and “Art Cinema” is Redundant

One of the earliest film analysis essays I wrote for this blog was My Take on Michael Bay’s Transformers (2007-2017) franchise. It was a long-winded musing (or rather a series of musings later coalesced into a single hodgepodge of angry banter) that was aimed primarily at the dumb, greedy side of the global movie business. … Continue reading

Reality Check: 2015 Oscar Nominations-Freakout Time

Every year around late January to early February when the Academy Award nominations are announced, tons of people waste plenty of energy whining and bitching about what films got picked and which didn’t. The complaints often go something like this: ‘Whaa, whaa, Whaaaaa, my favorite movie/actor/director/whomever/whatever didn’t get nominated! Whaaa, it’s almost like the Academy … Continue reading